Find the meaning of Flowers

Just a quick one today. We found this handy page on Flower Meanings. So whether you want to know which flower means good luck or I love you – check out Clare Florist for some inspiration…As always, let us know any you think are incorrect or missing by commenting below.

Who are you?

Today a reader pointed us towards two different genealogy resources which look ideal for any person keen on answering the question of ‘who am i?’ Whether you are looking for a tangible ancestral history, or a more general idea of where you came from, one of these sources should be of help to you.

The first is FindMyPast.com – a company based entirely around helping people build their family tree. The beauty of their system is that all of their records are online, giving you instant access to them and making it really quick and easy to research your UK history and create a family tree. You can search census records, births, deaths and marriages.

If you’d prefer something a bit more general to introduce you to the subject, try the Who do you think you are? Magazine. Based on the BBC series, the magazine explores the stories broadcast in the show, but also offers advice on tracing your own roots. There are also sections on local history and historic events that affected your ancestors. You can find out more about the Magazine here.



Animal moments to celebrate

Something new, well it made me happy anyway!
After spending so much time reading through BBC news and being constantly downtrodden with how many species of animals are closer and closer to extinction each day, it has been good to see something which celebrates the animals around us and the magic that has been caught on camera.
The BBC have released a new site section celebrating some of the acclaimed David Attenborough’s favourite moments from the last 30 years.
BBC Wildlife Finder.

Be up-to-date with all the latest animal stories from the BBC
BBC Magazines Wild Life

Scottish Island to become International Yoga Camp

Followers of Indias most popular lifestyle guru Swami Ji, aka Baba Ramdev, have bought the tiny North Ayrshire island of Little Cumbrae for £2million. The 700acres of uninhabited land will now be converted into an international yoga camp called Peace Island.

Baba Ramdev’s special brand of “pranayama yoga” has 80million followers worldwide who praise the man’s charisma, straight talking and the health benefits of his strict vegetarian diet, stretching routines and the circular breathing techniques that he promotes. Sunita Podder, 49, the island’s new owner, says before pranayama she was overweight and taking 12 tablets a day.

The ceremony to bless Little Cumbrae (to be known as Peace Island) attracted global interest. The Poddar family told the BBC they want to share what they have learned from the swami with the rest of Scotland. Mrs Poddar, in fact, says she is on a mission to use Swami Ji’s yoga as part of a 10-year campaign to clean up the poor health of the nation.




Top 3 Books on Hieroglyphics

These are the three best books I have read on the subject of Hieroglyphics – in no particular order:

The Rosetta Stone by R B Parkinson
Since my recent trip to the National Museum in Cairo, I’ve been fascinated by the Rosetta Stone. Seeing such an incredible piece of history (albeit a convincing replica) in the context of that remarkable country is something I recommend everyone should experience. This book is written by the Egyptian curator at the British Museum – that is the man currently in charge of the real Rosetta stone.

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Pyramids, Temples and Tombs of Ancient Egypt
Actually, the full name of the book is: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Pyramids, Temples and Tombs of Ancient Egypt: Discover the Fascinating and Mysterious World of the Pharoahs with Insightful Text and More Than 500 Stunning Colour Photographs…Yes, it’s a mouthful but if the title is that detailed, just imagine what the rest of the book is like! The main reason a hieroglyphics enthusiast should have this book is the close-up photographs of the carvings and paintings as well as information on their location and origin. Other than that, it’s a great all-round book on ancient Egypt.

Decoding Egyptian Hieroglyphs by Bridget McDermott
Although it is written by an expert, this book shies away from overtly academic language and instead assumes you have no previous knowledge of hieroglyphics…but even if you do it’s a great book. It highlights the most commonly used signs, their meaning and context and teaches the basic alphabet in order to help even a novice decode basic words, names and text.

Comment below if you have an alternate book that you recommend – or if you’d like to offer a review of another text you’ve read.